Digital Assembly. History is not the Past

podcast series
June 18-28, 2020


Available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Deezer.
 

The centerpiece of the digital Assembly program in June 2020 was a podcast series titled History is not the Past, which offers thoughts and discussions about present-day issues and future scenarios at the intersection of history, society, and culture. As we look to shape society for the future, it is crucial to bear the past in mind, that without remembering, we will lose our future. The podcast series is mostly in German with some contributions in English.

 

The podcast series was released daily from June 18 to 28, with 11 episodes in all covering a broad range of topics with music by Dota Kehr, Michaela Meise and Maya Shenfeld.

podcast episodes

Episode 1:Juliane Bischoff, Nicolaus Schafhausen and Mirjam Zadoff take a look at the latest social changes caused by the Covid 19 crisis.

Episode 2: New York Times journalistRoger Cohen and Mirjam Zadoff will offer a global look at the shift in political discourse as a result of populism, emotional mobilization, and interconnectivity among right-wing extremist movements, but also at new forms of solidarity, grief, and trauma, and the chance to build transnational, collective memories.

Episode 3 (in German): A critical historical look at the documenta event and the resulting institutional responsibility for the documenta Institute that is currently under development is the focus of the discussion between Nora Sternfeld and Christian Fuhrmeister. In the second contribution Christiane Wolf introduces the former Nazi “Gauforum” site in Weimar and the area’s redesign as a cultural and memorial site. A reading from letters designed by Martin Valdés-Stauber commemorates Munich victims of the Nazi “euthanasia” murders.

 

Episode 4 (in German): The extent to which history and remembrance are inscribed on the built environment is the topic of the discussion by Stephan Trüby and Paul Moritz Rabe, who thconsider “right-wing spaces” and the former forced labor camp at Neuaubing.

 

Episode 5 (in German): Dialogue and responsibility between different generations plays an important role in the discussion between Luisa Neubauer and Doron Rabinovici, who talk about the future of democracy and engagement within civil society from the perspective of their personal experiences.

 

Episode 6 (in German): Digital life and virtual networking plays a role in two conversations, one between Georg Diez and Nicolaus Schafhausen and the other between Sahana Udupa and Florian Hartleb. Diez advocates a democratic digital civil society where technological means open up new paths toward autonomy and co-determination. Udupa and Hartleb, for their part, examine the threats posed by radicalization on the Internet and the online dissemination of right-wing extremist thinking.

 

Episode 7 (in German):Armin Nassehi evaluates with Christine Hamel present-day social transformations and the political potential of alliances throughout society. Leon Kahane and Fabian Bechtle devote their contribution, Forum on Democratic Culture and Contemporary Art, to issues of aspirational identity in the present-day understanding of culture while calling for a critical review of cultural codes.

 

Episode8 (in German): The two artists of Tell me about yesterday tomorrow,, Michaela Melián and Willem de Rooij, talk to Lukas Graf about their artistic approach to past, present and remembrance. Lena Gorelik reads from her text Ich habe Angst.

 

Episode 9: Art in the public sphere is the topic of Ken Lum's and Paul Farber's conversation, which serves, in the context of their monument lab in Philadelphia, as the starting point for examining and collectively shaping societal representation.

Episode 10 (in German): Links between anti-Semitism and racism and the possibility of building an inclusive culture of thought take center stage in the discussion among Charlotte Wiedemann, Stefanie Schüler-Springorum, and Sonja Zekri. Interdisciplinary cooperation and the dialogue between the arts and scholarship are key aspects of curatorial practice for Clémentine Deliss, whose contribution is dedicated to exhibition and research projects in the context of post-social and cultural anthropology collections.

 

Episode 11 (in German):Max Czollek and Michael Brenner discuss with Mirjam historical and current notions of solidarity and the integrative power of narratives that embrace multiple perspectives.

additional program

5 July 2020, 8.30 pm: Q&A with Philippe Sands and Mirjam Zadoff
Mirjam Zadoff speaks with Philippe Sands about his book “East West Street” and the video performance "Rückkehr nach Lemberg"

 

Video performance Philippe Sands: Rückkehr nach Lemberg

Rückkehr nach Lemberg is a fascinating adaptation of Sands's concert reading "A Song of Good & Evil". As part of the Assembly program, the Munich Documentation Centre invited Philippe Sands, the actors Katja Riemann and Jasmin Tabatabai, French bass-baritone Laurent Naouri and jazz pianist Guillaume de Chassy to present their joint production to a Munich-based audience.

On June 18, 2020Harvard Kennedy School professor Khalil Muhammad talked to Mirjam Zadoff about "COVID-19, Racial Inequities and the Fragile State of American Democracy" via YouTube Live Stream – online here:

 

further online formats

Europe Ice Weather

Online publication eiswetter.eu by Sebastian Jung

from June 10, 2020

in cooperation with

The digital Assembly takes place in cooperation with the Federal Agency for Civic Education. Other partners are the Münchner Kammerspiele, the Schauburg München, the Städtische Galerie Nordhorn, the Amerikahaus Munich and the Bavarian American Academy as well as the online magazine MunichMag.

sponsors

Tell me about yesterday tomorrow is funded by the German Federal Cultural Foundation. The project is part of the culture program related to Canada’s Guest of Honour presentation at the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2020. We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Government of Canada.

Digital Assembly. History is not the Past

podcast series
June 18-28, 2020


Available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Deezer.
 

The centerpiece of the digital Assembly program in June 2020 was a podcast series titled History is not the Past, which offers thoughts and discussions about present-day issues and future scenarios at the intersection of history, society, and culture. As we look to shape society for the future, it is crucial to bear the past in mind, that without remembering, we will lose our future. The podcast series is mostly in German with some contributions in English.

 

The podcast series was released daily from June 18 to 28, with 11 episodes in all covering a broad range of topics with music by Dota Kehr, Michaela Meise and Maya Shenfeld.

podcast episodes

Episode 1:Juliane Bischoff, Nicolaus Schafhausen and Mirjam Zadoff take a look at the latest social changes caused by the Covid 19 crisis.

Episode 2: New York Times journalistRoger Cohen and Mirjam Zadoff will offer a global look at the shift in political discourse as a result of populism, emotional mobilization, and interconnectivity among right-wing extremist movements, but also at new forms of solidarity, grief, and trauma, and the chance to build transnational, collective memories.

Episode 3 (in German): A critical historical look at the documenta event and the resulting institutional responsibility for the documenta Institute that is currently under development is the focus of the discussion between Nora Sternfeld and Christian Fuhrmeister. In the second contribution Christiane Wolf introduces the former Nazi “Gauforum” site in Weimar and the area’s redesign as a cultural and memorial site. A reading from letters designed by Martin Valdés-Stauber commemorates Munich victims of the Nazi “euthanasia” murders.

 

Episode 4 (in German): The extent to which history and remembrance are inscribed on the built environment is the topic of the discussion by Stephan Trüby and Paul Moritz Rabe, who thconsider “right-wing spaces” and the former forced labor camp at Neuaubing.

 

Episode 5 (in German): Dialogue and responsibility between different generations plays an important role in the discussion between Luisa Neubauer and Doron Rabinovici, who talk about the future of democracy and engagement within civil society from the perspective of their personal experiences.

 

Episode 6 (in German): Digital life and virtual networking plays a role in two conversations, one between Georg Diez and Nicolaus Schafhausen and the other between Sahana Udupa and Florian Hartleb. Diez advocates a democratic digital civil society where technological means open up new paths toward autonomy and co-determination. Udupa and Hartleb, for their part, examine the threats posed by radicalization on the Internet and the online dissemination of right-wing extremist thinking.

 

Episode 7 (in German):Armin Nassehi evaluates with Christine Hamel present-day social transformations and the political potential of alliances throughout society. Leon Kahane and Fabian Bechtle devote their contribution, Forum on Democratic Culture and Contemporary Art, to issues of aspirational identity in the present-day understanding of culture while calling for a critical review of cultural codes.

 

Episode8 (in German): The two artists of Tell me about yesterday tomorrow,, Michaela Melián and Willem de Rooij, talk to Lukas Graf about their artistic approach to past, present and remembrance. Lena Gorelik reads from her text Ich habe Angst.

 

Episode 9: Art in the public sphere is the topic of Ken Lum's and Paul Farber's conversation, which serves, in the context of their monument lab in Philadelphia, as the starting point for examining and collectively shaping societal representation.

Episode 10 (in German): Links between anti-Semitism and racism and the possibility of building an inclusive culture of thought take center stage in the discussion among Charlotte Wiedemann, Stefanie Schüler-Springorum, and Sonja Zekri. Interdisciplinary cooperation and the dialogue between the arts and scholarship are key aspects of curatorial practice for Clémentine Deliss, whose contribution is dedicated to exhibition and research projects in the context of post-social and cultural anthropology collections.

 

Episode 11 (in German):Max Czollek and Michael Brenner discuss with Mirjam historical and current notions of solidarity and the integrative power of narratives that embrace multiple perspectives.